Hendeya هندية

This is Egyptian bellydancer Hendeya performing part of her nightclub show which also features shaabi singer Sami Ali (سامي علي ). Hendeya was very popular during the 1990s, while Sami Ali is best known to dancers from his songs with Sahar Hamdi.
Hendeya also danced in several Egyptian movies and you’ll find a couple of her scenes here on Vimeo. She’s from the same era as Lucy.

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Taroub (1968) طروب

This is Lebanese singer Taroub performing the song ‘Kadouka al Mayyas’ or ‘Addouka al Mayass'(المياس قدك) in a scene from the 1969 Lebanese/Turkish film ‘Essabat al Nissa’ (Gang of Women عصابة النساء). The bellydancer may be Taroub’s real life sister Mayada who was also an actress and occasional dancer. Can anyone confirm?
The film starred Turkish action man and heartthrob Cüneyt Arkin as Murad and Said el Moghrabi as Murad’s perpetually frightened offsider. Also starring was Lebanese singer Sabah, Egyptian comedian Ismail Yassin and there was also a cameo appearance by Yousef Wehbi.
Those who know heaps about the origins of Arabic and Turkish music tell me that the tune Taroub sings was originally composed by Iraqi born Mullah Othman al Musli (1854-1923) (الملا عثمان الموصلي). The tune’s still very popular in the Middle East – there’s a Turkish version of the same song titled ‘Ada Sahillerinde Bekliyorum’ and a Greek version too. If you watch old episodes of the Lebanese tv show ‘Jar al Amar’ (the show with the b/w check floor) the same song is sung by Syrian born Sabah Fakhri who made it his own. There’s also an updated version performed by Lebanese singer Melissa.
Now, back to the film which was shot in 1967-1968. As it was a joint Lebanese/Turkish venture, it was dubbed into Turkish and released there in 1968 with the title of ‘Bes Atesli Kadin’ or ‘Atesli delikanli’. In the Turkish version Cüneyt Arkin is very much ‘The Star’. Sabah’s songs were still in Arabic though. Izmir born actress Hülya Darcan starred as Ayda in the Turkish version in which many of Sabah’s acting scenes have been removed and Hülya Darcan’s inserted in order to make the film seem more ‘local’. Though this film was directed by Egyptian born Farouk (Frank) Agrama, in order to get around local quota requirements in Turkey, the Turkish version has the director’s name given as Seyfettin Tiryaki. The film was released in Egypt in 1969.
Trivia: Frank Agrama emigrated to the US and went on to direct many horror films. He’s described by the BRW (Business Review Weekly) as “…a gregarious, Egyptian-born B-movie producer turned TV distributor.” Frank Agrama was also involved in the Berlusconi tax fraud investigation in Italy. Yes, this man gets around!
Thanks again to Dr Kiss at the Horror Movie Forum. What Dr Kiss doesn’t know about his chosen genre, isn’t worth knowing.

Horeya Hassan (1951) حورية حسن

Horeya Hassan is the singer/dancer in this scene from the 1951 Egyptian drama ‘Ibn al Nil/e’ (Son of the Nile aka Nile Boy ابن النيل). The film was directed by Youssef Chahine and produced by early female film maker Mary Queeny. As the scene shifts from the nightclub singer to the village men on the boat the same song is being sung by both groups. Shukry Sarhan plays Hamid, a country boy who dislikes his life as a rural farmer but marries Zubaida who’s a village girl. Hamid decides to leave the village behind and catch the train to Cairo, the big city. There’s an accident, he thinks Zubaida has been killed and he heads to the city alone. There he quickly changes into a ‘city slicker’ and gets involved with a gang based in a nightclub. He’s eventually arrested and after serving his sentence returns to village life a wiser man. On his return to the village he saves his own young son from drowning and he is reunited with Zubaida but that’s another story. This scene is set in the nightclub, Shukry Sarhan is the tearful man and the woman who sits with him at the end is actress/dancer Samiha Tawfik who plays Poussi the club dancer. Also starring were Faten Hamama as Hamid’s village wife Zubaida, Yehia Shaheen as Hamid’s brother and ‘Mr Evil’ Mahmoud al Meliji as Kamal, the gang leader.

The Great Unknown (1988)

This is another performance by the uncredited dancer in the 1988 Egyptian film ‘El Gadaan al Talatha’ (الجدعان الثلاثة). The singer with her is Fatma Eid (عيد فاطمة ). Any IDs on the dancer? The film starred Samir Ghanem, Mahmoud Reda (the actor not the dancer) and actress Rawaa El Kateb.
Trivia: Fatma Eid is the female half of the duo who sang ‘Ali Looz’, Nagwa Fouad’s old time signature song.

Howaida al Hachem (Lebanon) هويدا الهاشم

The dancer in this clip is Howaida al Hachem (هويدا الهاشم) aka Howaida Hachem, Howaida Hashem, Hwyda al Hatchem etc etc. Howaida was popular in Lebanon in the 1980-90s and is of the same era as Samara, Dani Boustros and Amani who often performed at the same venues. The clip is filmed in a Beirut nightclub and in this clip she wears a gold bedlah with a leopard print skirt and veil. Howaida made many tv appearances on LBC (Lebanon Broadcasting Corp) and along with her shows at nightclubs, weddings and parties, built a career that focused on performing long, intricate drum solos. And she was good. The drum solos often ended with a death defying Turkish drop which she performed while wearing high heels!
Trivia: I understand that after retiring in the early 2000s she married and now lives in Cyprus.

Hind Rostom – a retrospective هند رستم

This is a brief retrospective of the career of Egyptian actress Hind Rostom ( هند رستم ). While it covers her long and sometimes controversial film career, she was also a good dancer and danced in many of her film roles. The retrospective also includes a “blink and you’ll miss it” shamadan scene from the 1963 Egyptian film ‘Shafika el Qebteya’ (Shafika the Copt شفيقة القبطية) where she played the title role. This film was about the dancer who’s credited with being the first to perform while balancing a shamadan (candelabra) on her head.
Hind Rostom (1929-2011) was an Egyptian actress who’s remembered mainly for her good looks and her many film roles as a seductress, which is a bit sad as she was a good actress when her range was tested. To quote Egyptian journalist Reem Ghazal, ‘Rostom was presented as an intoxicating mix of Rita Hayworth, Brigitte Bardot and Marilyn Monroe.’ And as you can see, Hind Rostom was also a good bellydancer. She retired in 1979 saying that she wanted the audiences to remember her at her best.
Hind Rostom’s second marriage to Dr Mohamed Fayad lasted nearly 50 years. Unfortunately at the time of her husband’s death which was shortly before hers, Dr Fayad’s family took legal action against her to reclaim assets they said were theirs.